Attorney for Portlock madam said his client was set up by ICE agent

4
2522
Malia Arciero
Malia Arciero
Malia Arciero

HONOLULU – The attorney for Malia Arciero, a madam who operated her business out of the elite Oahu neighborhood Portlock for about a decade, will go to court Thursday, Oct. 23, to attempt to get drug possession and drug dealing charges against her dismissed.

Arciero, who said her elite escort business offered prostitution services to some of Hawaii’s most prominent law enforcement, politicians and entertainers, was arrested in April 2013, but on charges unrelated to her escort business.

Honolulu Attorney Gary Dubin, who represents Arcerio, said he’s filed a motion to dismiss the criminal complaint against Arciero based on “Outrageous Government Conduct and Entrapment, Coercing her confession, and seizing items without probable cause.”

Arciero admitted in an exclusive interview with Hawaii Reporter that she was a prostitute and madam.

As proof of her business operations, she provided two of her five “black books” to Hawaii Reporter, which listed clients’ names, phone numbers, emails and fetishes.

Arciero claims she was falsely arrested for drug charges so that Ryan Faulkner, a Special Agent with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement division, could force her to work as his informant.

Neither Faulkner nor the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement division has commented on the case.

Arciero has filed a separate civil lawsuit against Faulkner.

She accuses him of abusing his authority, taking money and drugs from drug and arms dealers, and sexually assaulting her while she was handcuffed at ICE headquarters.

Attorney Gary Dubin, who represents Arcerio, said he’s filed a motion to dismiss the criminal complaint against Arciero based on “Outrageous Government Conduct and Entrapment, Coercing her confession, and seizing items without probable cause.”

Advertisements

Comments

comments

4 COMMENTS

  1. I am glad there is at least one journalist in this state who is keeping tabs on this case. The rest of them should be ashamed of themselves.

  2. Malia Arciero's hearing was scheduled for October 23rd, which was last Thursday. Is there an update to this story?

    Has anyone bothered to pull the cop's britches down to see if Ms. Arciero is telling the truth about his two-tone bone?
    Is this allegedly dirty cop still collecting taxpayer's money at work without having even been investigated? Barney Fife, deputy of Mayberry, could solve this case in about five seconds.

    The double-standard of Justice being revealed here is as extreme and blatant as it could be. Anyone in a position of responsibility for this felonious malfeasance ought o be falling all over themselves to make certain of whether or not Malia Arciero is telling the truth. She should certainly be in protective custody where she can be protected against the insidious workings of underworld corruption within Hawaii's "legal" system.

  3. Sounds a little like the 14 year old who was forced to work as an informant by the U.S. govt and was then fed to the shartks so he could not tell his story http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/24/dea-war-

    From the article
    "In the 1980s, federal agents with the DEA and FBI plucked 14-year-old Richard Wershe from his Detroit high school and began crafting a new identity for him as a drug kingpin. Over the next few years, the teenage Wershe would live a double life, one as the legend who'd later be known as White Boy Rick, one of the most notorious drug lords in city, and the other as a valuable informant for the DEA and other law enforcement agencies.

    "I was just a kid when the agents pulled me out of high school in the ninth grade and had me out to 3 in the morning every night," Wershe told The Fix in 2013. "They gave me a fake ID when I was 15 that said I was 21 so I could travel to Vegas and to Miami to do drug deals."

    With intelligence provided by Wershe, authorities were able to make a series of high-profile arrests, disrupting Detroit's rampant drug trade and the police corruption that had grown alongside it.

    But in 1988, then 17 and no longer an informant, Wershe was pulled over and busted for work in the same drug business as the one to which the DEA had introduced him. The 17 pounds of cocaine found in his car resulted in a life sentence. He's the only convict still behind bars in Michigan to receive a life sentence as a minor under the state's now-repealed "650-lifer" law. Many of the targets whom Wershe helped put in jail have long since been released."

Comments are closed.