Marines from Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463 Detachment Bravo unload the first of two CH-53E Super Stallions off the Russian An-124 cargo plane at Marine Corps Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Sept 7. “HMH 463 Detachment Bravo was established to lay the foundation here for the arrival of the CH-53Es,” Lt. Col. Jeffrey L. Davis, officer in charge, Detachment Bravo, said. “I have a total of 79 Marines here that will be working on helicopters when they arrive.” After the Super Stallions were moved into the hangar for the initial inspection, the Marines of the squadron began to reassemble the aircraft for operations. The entire process could take a few days to a few weeks. Two additional CH-53Es are scheduled to arrive Sept 10.

SUBMITTED BY MARINE CORPS BASE HAWAII, Oahu – Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463 “Pegasus” welcomed the new arrival of two CH-53E Super Stallions at Hanger 102 at Marine Corps Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Sept. 7.

Two more Super Stallions will join the other arrivals Sept. 10 marking the first four of 12 Super Stallions to replace the squadron’s CH-53D Sea Stallions.

“This transition is truly a historical event, being the first CH-53A squadron and now the last CH-53E,” Lt. Col. Jeffrey L. Davis, officer in charge, Detachment Bravo, said. “This speaks volumes of what Pegasus has done for the Marine Corps. We’re preparing ourselves to answer the call of the nation and be the heavy lift support of the III Marine Expeditionary Force.”

The military began development of the Super Stallions in 1981 and the Marine Corps has a total of 152 Super Stallions around the world in service today.

The main difference between the Super and Sea Stallions is the load capacity of each aircraft. The Super Stallion’s load capacity is nearly 74,000 pounds, twice as much as the Sea Stallion, due to an additional third engine.

Other noticeable differences between the Super and Sea Stallions are the Super Stallion has seven rotary blades instead of six, and the Super Stallion is about ten and a half feet longer than the Sea Stallion.

“The Super Stallions have done marvelous work for Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom,” Davis said. “When we’re hitting the initial assault, we need that robust heavy lift especially when moving Marines and logistics around.”

Submitted by 1st Lt. Diann M. Olson, MCB Hawaii

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