by Carleen MacKay ::  Angelica Lewis :: Fabian Lewis :: Rob Kinslow

Enough about the past; let’s talk about the future of work.

How, when and where will we work? 21stCenturywork

We are already working full-time, part-time, on-demand, temporarily, once-in-awhile…from home, from our car, a train, plane or automobile and from across town or across the world. We work for free, for a fee, for ourselves, for the good of others, for learning and/or for the fun of it! We gain-share, bargain or are paid an hourly rate.

The speed of change is accelerating. Within a year or two, few people will ask the question we are asking.

The more you have to offer the changed market, the more choices you’ll have to work in any – or all – ways we have just highlighted.

The more you prepare to meet the demands of change, the more adaptable you’ll be. The more you will be able to accommodate swiftly moving life circumstances and interests.

What are a few of the most recent changes that have affected how, who and where some of us will work in Hawaii in the near future?

hand-1112469_1920First, take a look at the on-demand world and you’ll soon have help with everything from Spring Cleaning to furniture packing. Haven’t heard about the hundreds of on-demand companies in Hawaii? Take a look at how many home food delivery options are a short 808 call away. Want a glass of wine with your dinner? Google “home wine delivery – Honolulu.” Prepare to see well over 150 home delivery options. Your favorite food and wine will be on your table within 24 to 48 hours.

These, and many other firms are delivering services and goods in new ways that will affect you—including, how you work, where you might work, or… how you shop!

The tip of an iceberg of change is floating your way. Keep looking. A new option will emerge tomorrow or the very next day. We’ll keep you posted to many of the changes.

Speaking of changes… here’s one to watch: reasonably long-term jobs with a good company began to change in the 1970’s and ‘80’s. Such jobs are now only one way of working and if trends are to be believed, also diminishing in numbers.

The On-Demand, Hyper-Shift, Work from Anywhere Economy is here. Everyone is now a business – including you!

It’s time to learn how to run You, Inc. But, it’s a bad idea to solo until you are ready to fly without a wingman.

Ask us how we can help you to prepare for a future that matters. Let’s #makeworkbetter, ok?

Look us up on LinkedIn:  Carleen MacKay ::  Angelica Lewis :: Fabian Lewis :: Rob Kinslow



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After 22-y of self-funding social improvement projects, I can say that if the wealth holders in our society would spend 40-60% of their income on social improvement projects, these islands would be a much nicer place. Whether it is decreasing entropy, building community resilience, giving voice-to-the-voiceless, or making visible-the-invisible, my teams envision, innovate, and demonstrate community improvements, through inspiration, education, lean action and community synergy, using both local and global campaigns, focused in the areas of conservation, agriculture, and energy innovation. For several years I served on the Umematsu and Yasu Watada Lectures on Peace, Social Justice and the Environment, bringing voices like Frances Moore Lappe, David Korten, Richard Heinberg, Helena Norberg Hodge and Dr. Steven Schneider to Honolulu. I've been a participant and social philanthropist in the fabric of the islands, via for-benefit, for-profit and faith networks. Worked my way to a masters degree with distinction in Sustainable Development Leadership from Hawaii Pacific University. Change agent, strategic sustainability advisor, and inspirational public speaker, I've spoke to audiences across Hawaii's business, government, and educational sectors. Mixing a friendly approach, a professional curiosity, and downbeat humor, in my presentations, shift happens. At, I writes about science, climate change, spirituality, and systems, and how these scale to social improvement.