The biggest refinement of the Vickers Combat Applications Sling is the proprietary, quick adjust buckle which makes it easy for the shooter to rapidly and precisely alter the sling length.

By Rob Kay and RN Price

The biggest refinement of the Vickers Combat Applications Sling is the proprietary, quick adjust buckle which makes it easy for the shooter to rapidly and precisely alter the sling length.

The primacy of the two-point sling is a subject that is near and dear to the heart of Larry Vickers, whose name is now synonymous with elite training and tactical gear. With over 20 years’ experience in US Army Special Operations units (including 15 years in Delta Force) Vickers knows a thing or two about equipment.

After all those years, his conclusion is that the quick adjust two point sling “is the best all-around choice for a carbine sling and the overwhelming favorite in the Spec Ops circles I run in. It offers the best features, all things considered…”

However, despite how much he learned to like the sling during his time in the service, he believed it could be refined and ultimately, improved.

Improve it he did.

The genesis of his new, improved sling came about after a chance meeting with Ashley Burnsed, a Savannah Georgia native, and the founder of Blue Force Gear. Vickers was looking for a manufacturing partner to help him create his “dream sling” and quite coincidentally meet Burnsed in a tactical course he was giving.

The hardware, buckle and strap are very high quality.

He was impressed with Blue Force Gear’s products and shortly after, Vickers says the two “put their heads together” and designed the Vickers Combat Applications Sling (aka VCAS). Says Vickers, “Ashley did a great job turning my ideas into hardware.”

It remains Blue Force Gear’s bestselling product.

Not only is it popular with civilians. The Vickers Sling is currently Government Issue for the USMC and the Air Force Security Forces.

What’s special about the two point design?

For starters, the two-point sling affords far greater stability compared to the one-point design. It comes down to ergonomics and practicality. A rifle attached to two points is going to remain closer to the body, and offer the opportunity use both hands if the situation warrants this.

If a rifle is dropped using a two-point sling, the weight distribution is such that the rifle will not tip downward and hit the ground. On the contrary it will most likely right itself to a diagonal position which will allow the operator the option to shoot from the knees.

If you’re going to shoot away from the bench you absolutely need a sling. The Vickers Sling is tough to beat.

Although different rifles have different configurations for mounting a two point sling, generally it can be attached to a standard buttstock with an adaptor or, with a push-button QD style arrangement on a collapsible stock. On the fore end, the sling can be mounted along the rail or wrapped around a conventional handguard.

The upshot is that two point sling can be adapted to fit the individual’s particular needs and body type.

What exactly has Vickers done to improve the best sling platform around?

In our opinion one of the best features of the Vickers sling is that their proprietary, quick adjust buckle makes it easy for the shooter to rapidly and precisely alter the sling length without excess strap that will flap or tangle.

It’s quite easy to use and in only seconds you can tailor the size that fits you.

This “quick change” component is helpful when it comes to shoulder transitions or in other situations. For example of an operator has to scale a wall or a ladder and needs two hands, the rifle can be held close.

We think this product is a winner both for experienced operators or newbies, who have come to the conclusion that a sling is an absolute necessity.

Price is $44 on Amazon.

Photos courtesy of On Target staff.

Questions?  Comments?  Contact us at ontargethawaii@gmail.com

Rob Kay writes about firearms for Hawaii Reporter and is the author of How to Buy an AK-47.
 
Read more of Rob’s articles on OnTargetHawaii.com

 

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