by Carleen MacKay ::  Angelica Lewis :: Fabian Lewis :: Rob Kinslow

Think about five short years from now, UNLESS something radical changes…wakeupwithpurpose

By 2021…

  1. The old will be older and broker and millions, in this fastest aging of U.S. States, will increase dependence upon younger generations amid overburdened social and healthcare systems that are ready to plunge our economy into a state-of-disaster.
  1. Gen “Z” will be out in full force – half won’t be ready and many more will be denied access to specific skills and competencies the future demands. Increased negative economic and societal challenges will increase major differences. In Hawaii, for example, college costs will continue to rise much faster than subsequent wage growth.
  2. Hawaii’s workers will not be in the full-time, “job” workforce. In the private sector, needed skills, competencies and talent will be used when needed, if needed and as often as needed. The race to a safe haven in the public sector will be overtaken by underfunded pensions. Our ability to pay for the last of the “lifetime” jobs, already standing on shaky ground, will be vulnerable to changes you might not want to experience.

Yet, IF we straighten up and fly right… support our people,

By 2021…

  1. Old age will be re-defined and Kupuna will be encouraged to continue to contribute to the world of work – well into their 70’s, perhaps 80’s. Likewise, a shift to emerging active aging programs, such as health-focused Blue Zones project, will prove beneficial to all.generation-z_infographic
  1. Gen “Z” will have many more opportunities to learn at modest costs. Much of this learning will be online and will be augmented with the dedicated help of pensioned, older folks who will have the time and interest to actively mentor the most challenged of Gen Z’ers. And, by the way, the youngest among us will also mentor up to help Gen Y, X generations learn what they have to teach.
  1. We will all learn to manage our work lives as our businesses – not as simply jobs! We will embrace lifetime learning, a term that, once-upon-a-time, was simply granted lip service. We will grow our careers, re-align our lives in line with our own changing interests and changing technologies, re-boot old interests and help others to succeed.

We are your Wingmen

Look us up on LinkedIn:  Carleen MacKay ::  Angelica Lewis :: Fabian Lewis :: Rob Kinslow



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After 22-y of self-funding social improvement projects, I can say that if the wealth holders in our society would spend 40-60% of their income on social improvement projects, these islands would be a much nicer place. Whether it is decreasing entropy, building community resilience, giving voice-to-the-voiceless, or making visible-the-invisible, my teams envision, innovate, and demonstrate community improvements, through inspiration, education, lean action and community synergy, using both local and global campaigns, focused in the areas of conservation, agriculture, and energy innovation. For several years I served on the Umematsu and Yasu Watada Lectures on Peace, Social Justice and the Environment, bringing voices like Frances Moore Lappe, David Korten, Richard Heinberg, Helena Norberg Hodge and Dr. Steven Schneider to Honolulu. I've been a participant and social philanthropist in the fabric of the islands, via for-benefit, for-profit and faith networks. Worked my way to a masters degree with distinction in Sustainable Development Leadership from Hawaii Pacific University. Change agent, strategic sustainability advisor, and inspirational public speaker, I've spoke to audiences across Hawaii's business, government, and educational sectors. Mixing a friendly approach, a professional curiosity, and downbeat humor, in my presentations, shift happens. At, I writes about science, climate change, spirituality, and systems, and how these scale to social improvement.