Saturday, September 18, 2021
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Wanted Fugitive: Roger Larson

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CrimeStoppers and the Honolulu Police Department want the public’s
assistance in locating Roger Larson. Larson is wanted for a $30,000
criminal contempt warrant. Larson is also wanted for questioning in an auto theft case that occurred in the Wahiawa area earlier this week. Larson frequents the Salt Lake area and is believe to be armed with a handgun. Larson is considered dangerous. Do not approach him.

Anonymous calls may be made to CrimeStoppers at 955-8300, *CRIME on your cellular phone. Free cellular calls are provided by AT&T, Nextel Hawaii, Sprint PCS and Verizon Wireless Hawaii.

Roger Larson, aka Norman Larson, Rodger Larson, Roger William Keala Larson

*Hawaiian male, 35

*6’1″, 195 lbs., heavy build

*Brown hair, brown eyes

*Mustache

Honolulu CrimeStoppers Inc., will pay a cash reward of up to $1,000 for information which results in the arrest of a wanted person or the solving of case(s) reported to CrimeStoppers Honolulu Inc. All calls are confidential. Do not approach any suspect. All suspects and wanted fugitives should be considered armed and dangerous. All calls are confidential and anonymous. Persons who participate in the crime, or are victims of the crime are ineligible to receive CrimeStoppers rewards. Be a CrimeStopper and call the hot line at 955-8300 or *Crime on your cellular telephone.

Access the CrimeStoppers Web site at http://www.crimestoppers-honolulu.org or the Student CrimeStoppers Web site at http://www.studentcrimestoppers.org

Wanted Fugitive: Roger Larson

0

CrimeStoppers and the Honolulu Police Department want the public’s assistance in locating Roger Larson. Larson is wanted for a $30,000 criminal contempt warrant. Larson is also wanted for questioning in an auto theft case that occurred in the Wahiawa area earlier this week. Larson frequents the Salt Lake area and is believe to be armed with a handgun. Larson is considered dangerous. Do not approach him. Anonymous calls may be made to CrimeStoppers at 955-8300, *CRIME on your cellular phone. Free cellular calls are provided by AT&T, Nextel Hawaii, Sprint PCS and Verizon Wireless Hawaii. Roger Larson, aka Norman Larson, Rodger Larson, Roger William Keala Larson *Hawaiian male, 35 *6’1″, 195 lbs., heavy build *Brown hair, brown eyes *Mustache Honolulu CrimeStoppers Inc., will pay a cash reward of up to $1,000 for information which results in the arrest of a wanted person or the solving of case(s) reported to CrimeStoppers Honolulu Inc. All calls are confidential. Do not approach any suspect. All suspects and wanted fugitives should be considered armed and dangerous. All calls are confidential and anonymous. Persons who participate in the crime, or are victims of the crime are ineligible to receive CrimeStoppers rewards. Be a CrimeStopper and call the hot line at 955-8300 or *Crime on your cellular telephone. Access the CrimeStoppers Web site at http://www.crimestoppers-honolulu.org or the Student CrimeStoppers Web site at http://www.studentcrimestoppers.org

When the Government Shops Smart, the Taxpayers Benefit

0

I hope you are having a great holidays as I am. I drove by my local mall today, and thought “I am soooo done with shopping for a while.” I glanced over at my wife, and she had a look of longing. I hate to shop, she loves it. Pretty typical.

I found myself thinking that I wish government agencies were more like my wife and less like me. This holiday season has brought a flood of stories across my desk that show how fundamental and far reaching are the benefits when government agencies embrace competition and do a little shopping for services.

In our nation’s capital, the Office of Management and Budget broke with tradition and decided to see if private printers could beat the Government Printing Office’s deal for printing the 2004 federal budget. The result — the GPO cut its price 23 percent ($108,370) and kept the work. That is $100k a year that GPO could have saved us any time they chose, but they never chose to do so until their customer decided to shop. (read about it at http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/1202/122702b1.htm)

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, a study showed that the city garage cost $87.20 to change the oil and lube city vehicles, while private dealerships charge the city only $36.54 for the same service. City workers argue they should try to improve their operations before the work is sent to Jiffy Lube. But they were not saying that before their customer went shopping. (read about it at http://www.krqe.com/Global/story.asp?s=%20%201048658)

Back in Washington, D.C., the Forest Service announced plans to compare the work currently done by thousands of its workers to bids by the private sector. The National Federation of Federal Employees Forest Service Council objects, saying “We will lose out. It will not be a real valid comparison. . . . We have no opportunity to [show we can] do better. So, if you have an inefficient organization, which I admit we have, we’re going to lose.” Hmmm. So, you know you are inefficient, you haven’t done anything about it, and in effect are saying “Well, now that you are shopping, we want to change what we offer.” (read about it at http://federaltimes.com/index.php?S=1153147)

In California, the Indio Charter School offers mostly Hispanic students the best education in town, beating the 13 local public schools average test scores by a handsome margin. Moreover, the school offers families, many of whom visit Mexico on the weekends, a schedule of four longer days rather than the tradition five days, actually teaching for 110 extra minutes of instruction each week. Now the County is using the charter school’s schedule as an excuse to try to destroy it. Never mind that the schedule has been in place for years-the County only acted when the charter’s performance showed up the local public schools. While others whose customers have started to shop have worked to improve what they offer, Riverside County decided to try to eliminate the competition. (read about it at http://www.rppi.org/charterschoolstory.html)

Back again to our nation’s capital, where the Post Office is learning about shopping. After September 11th, USPS was no longer allowed to ship heavy mail on commercial airlines. So they switched to FedEx, with the unexpected result of cost savings and significantly higher customer satisfaction (oddly, they couldn’t say how much they are saving-way to know your business, guys). Too bad the Post Office wasn’t really acting like a business and shopping for the best deal before September 11th. (read about it at http://federaltimes.com/index.php?S=1153150

And last, but not least, in Philadelphia, the nation has watched the city’s controversial decision to turn over operation of many of its worst performing schools to Edison Schools Inc. It turns out Edison has a benchmark testing program that provides continuous feedback on each student’s academic weakness to teachers so they can fine tune their lessons. It took the other public schools in Philly almost no time flat to realize this is a good idea and began implementing a similar system. Too bad the public schools weren’t looking for ways to fine tune their lessons until their customer started to shop around. (read about it at http://educationweak.blogspot.com)

I don’t want to beat a dead horse, but you have to see the same thing I do. There is a trend here. When the government shops smart, the taxpayers benefit. I’d like to see them shopping like it’s the post-Christmas sale season all year long.

Happy New Year!

”’Adrian Moore is the Vice President of Research for the Reason Foundation. He can be reached by email at:”’ mailto:Adrian.Moore@reason.org

”’Originally published by Reason Foundation, which is a public policy think tank promoting choice, competition and a dynamic market economy as the foundation for human dignity and progress. For more information, contact Geoffrey Segal, Director of Privatization and Government Reform Policy at:”’ mailto:geoffrey.segal@reason.org ”’Visit the Reason Web site at:”’ http://www.rppi.org ”’or go to the Reason Public Policy Institute’s Privatization Center at:”’ http://www.privatization.org ”’for information on government reform, privatization, contracting out and public/private partnerships.”’

When the Government Shops Smart, the Taxpayers Benefit

0

I hope you are having a great holidays as I am. I drove by my local mall today, and thought “I am soooo done with shopping for a while.” I glanced over at my wife, and she had a look of longing. I hate to shop, she loves it. Pretty typical. I found myself thinking that I wish government agencies were more like my wife and less like me. This holiday season has brought a flood of stories across my desk that show how fundamental and far reaching are the benefits when government agencies embrace competition and do a little shopping for services. In our nation’s capital, the Office of Management and Budget broke with tradition and decided to see if private printers could beat the Government Printing Office’s deal for printing the 2004 federal budget. The result — the GPO cut its price 23 percent ($108,370) and kept the work. That is $100k a year that GPO could have saved us any time they chose, but they never chose to do so until their customer decided to shop. (read about it at http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/1202/122702b1.htm) In Albuquerque, New Mexico, a study showed that the city garage cost $87.20 to change the oil and lube city vehicles, while private dealerships charge the city only $36.54 for the same service. City workers argue they should try to improve their operations before the work is sent to Jiffy Lube. But they were not saying that before their customer went shopping. (read about it at http://www.krqe.com/Global/story.asp?s=%20%201048658) Back in Washington, D.C., the Forest Service announced plans to compare the work currently done by thousands of its workers to bids by the private sector. The National Federation of Federal Employees Forest Service Council objects, saying “We will lose out. It will not be a real valid comparison. . . . We have no opportunity to [show we can] do better. So, if you have an inefficient organization, which I admit we have, we’re going to lose.” Hmmm. So, you know you are inefficient, you haven’t done anything about it, and in effect are saying “Well, now that you are shopping, we want to change what we offer.” (read about it at http://federaltimes.com/index.php?S=1153147) In California, the Indio Charter School offers mostly Hispanic students the best education in town, beating the 13 local public schools average test scores by a handsome margin. Moreover, the school offers families, many of whom visit Mexico on the weekends, a schedule of four longer days rather than the tradition five days, actually teaching for 110 extra minutes of instruction each week. Now the County is using the charter school’s schedule as an excuse to try to destroy it. Never mind that the schedule has been in place for years-the County only acted when the charter’s performance showed up the local public schools. While others whose customers have started to shop have worked to improve what they offer, Riverside County decided to try to eliminate the competition. (read about it at http://www.rppi.org/charterschoolstory.html) Back again to our nation’s capital, where the Post Office is learning about shopping. After September 11th, USPS was no longer allowed to ship heavy mail on commercial airlines. So they switched to FedEx, with the unexpected result of cost savings and significantly higher customer satisfaction (oddly, they couldn’t say how much they are saving-way to know your business, guys). Too bad the Post Office wasn’t really acting like a business and shopping for the best deal before September 11th. (read about it at http://federaltimes.com/index.php?S=1153150 And last, but not least, in Philadelphia, the nation has watched the city’s controversial decision to turn over operation of many of its worst performing schools to Edison Schools Inc. It turns out Edison has a benchmark testing program that provides continuous feedback on each student’s academic weakness to teachers so they can fine tune their lessons. It took the other public schools in Philly almost no time flat to realize this is a good idea and began implementing a similar system. Too bad the public schools weren’t looking for ways to fine tune their lessons until their customer started to shop around. (read about it at http://educationweak.blogspot.com) I don’t want to beat a dead horse, but you have to see the same thing I do. There is a trend here. When the government shops smart, the taxpayers benefit. I’d like to see them shopping like it’s the post-Christmas sale season all year long. Happy New Year! ”Adrian Moore is the Vice President of Research for the Reason Foundation. He can be reached by email at:” mailto:Adrian.Moore@reason.org ”Originally published by Reason Foundation, which is a public policy think tank promoting choice, competition and a dynamic market economy as the foundation for human dignity and progress. For more information, contact Geoffrey Segal, Director of Privatization and Government Reform Policy at:” mailto:geoffrey.segal@reason.org ”Visit the Reason Web site at:” http://www.rppi.org ”or go to the Reason Public Policy Institute’s Privatization Center at:” http://www.privatization.org ”for information on government reform, privatization, contracting out and public/private partnerships.”

From Being Lonely to Being Rude

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“Suzanne Gelb Image”

”Happy, But Lonely — Why Does This Happen?”

Q: Dear Dr. Gelb:

I am working on personal growth and am making good progress at being in charge of my own happiness, rather than looking to others to make me happy. For example, today I went shopping, took myself to lunch, and had a lovely time. I went for a walk this evening and was feeling quite good, when all of a sudden I felt a loneliness and a longing for closeness to other people. I did reach out and called a friend, but mostly I felt a longing for being close and important to another person, and that is lacking in my life right now. I thought you might have some insight into what happened.

Thank you.

A: Dr. Gelb says . . .

Dear Longing for Closeness:

When a person experiences qualities of self-love, self-worth and self-respect, such as you appear to describe in your question, then it is not uncommon for those qualities to at times prompt a recognition for a desire for closeness or company. The nurturing qualities of self-love and self-respect can also provide the needed sustenance to support a person to not feel lonely, when for whatever reason they are alone. It is helpful to keep in mind, I believe, that each person is an entity unto themselves and as such we were designed to satisfy all our emotional and physical hungers. Trusted friends can also be a wonderful resource to replace feelings of loneliness with some good company.

”Dinner Disruptions — What’s the Remedy?”

Q: Dear Dr. Gelb:

I was having dinner at a restaurant and was seated in a booth next to a banquet table of an entire family. This family appeared to be affluent, well-educated and neatly groomed and dressed. However, the toddler in the family decided that he would entertain himself with a spoon and began to bang it on the table. The entire family thought this was funny, and of course it was annoying everyone close enough to hear it. I asked Management if they could correct the problem. They obviously ignored the request, and the noise continued. After about five minutes, I spoke loudly and posed the question, “Does this child have a parent?” Immediately the child stopped the pounding. Was I rude to open my mouth?

Indigestion

A: Dr. Gelb says . . .

Dear Indigestion:

As assertive as some restaurant managers may be, many are legitimately concerned about the embarrassment and retaliation that could result from an attempt to correct social etiquette. As to your abrupt statement to curb the noise, I believe that this could be considered rude. Some would say that a more appropriate action would be to speak to the child’s parents and let them know that the noise is bothersome, and then ask if there is anything they could do to correct it.

”’Suzanne J. Gelb, Ph.D., J.D. authors this daily column, Dr. Gelb Says, which answers questions about daily living and behavior issues. Dr. Gelb is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Honolulu. She holds a Ph.D. in Psychology and a Ph.D. in Human Services. Dr. Gelb is also a published author of a book on Overcoming Addictions and a book on Relationships.”’

”’This column is intended for entertainment use only and is not intended for the purpose of psychological diagnosis, treatment or personalized advice. For more about the column’s purpose, see”’ “An Online Intro to Dr. Gelb Says”

”’Email your questions to mailto:DrGelbSays@hawaiireporter.com More information on Dr. Gelb’s services and related resources available at”’ http://www.DrGelbSays.com

From Being Lonely to Being Rude

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Suzanne Gelb Image ‘Happy, But Lonely — Why Does This Happen?’ Q: Dear Dr. Gelb: I am working on personal growth and am making good progress at being in charge of my own happiness, rather than looking to others to make me happy. For example, today I went shopping, took myself to lunch, and had a lovely time. I went for a walk this evening and was feeling quite good, when all of a sudden I felt a loneliness and a longing for closeness to other people. I did reach out and called a friend, but mostly I felt a longing for being close and important to another person, and that is lacking in my life right now. I thought you might have some insight into what happened. Thank you. A: Dr. Gelb says . . . Dear Longing for Closeness: When a person experiences qualities of self-love, self-worth and self-respect, such as you appear to describe in your question, then it is not uncommon for those qualities to at times prompt a recognition for a desire for closeness or company. The nurturing qualities of self-love and self-respect can also provide the needed sustenance to support a person to not feel lonely, when for whatever reason they are alone. It is helpful to keep in mind, I believe, that each person is an entity unto themselves and as such we were designed to satisfy all our emotional and physical hungers. Trusted friends can also be a wonderful resource to replace feelings of loneliness with some good company. ‘Dinner Disruptions — What’s the Remedy?’ Q: Dear Dr. Gelb: I was having dinner at a restaurant and was seated in a booth next to a banquet table of an entire family. This family appeared to be affluent, well-educated and neatly groomed and dressed. However, the toddler in the family decided that he would entertain himself with a spoon and began to bang it on the table. The entire family thought this was funny, and of course it was annoying everyone close enough to hear it. I asked Management if they could correct the problem. They obviously ignored the request, and the noise continued. After about five minutes, I spoke loudly and posed the question, “Does this child have a parent?” Immediately the child stopped the pounding. Was I rude to open my mouth? Indigestion A: Dr. Gelb says . . . Dear Indigestion: As assertive as some restaurant managers may be, many are legitimately concerned about the embarrassment and retaliation that could result from an attempt to correct social etiquette. As to your abrupt statement to curb the noise, I believe that this could be considered rude. Some would say that a more appropriate action would be to speak to the child’s parents and let them know that the noise is bothersome, and then ask if there is anything they could do to correct it. ”Suzanne J. Gelb, Ph.D., J.D. authors this daily column, Dr. Gelb Says, which answers questions about daily living and behavior issues. Dr. Gelb is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Honolulu. She holds a Ph.D. in Psychology and a Ph.D. in Human Services. Dr. Gelb is also a published author of a book on Overcoming Addictions and a book on Relationships.” ”This column is intended for entertainment use only and is not intended for the purpose of psychological diagnosis, treatment or personalized advice. For more about the column’s purpose, see” “An Online Intro to Dr. Gelb Says” ”Email your questions to mailto:DrGelbSays@hawaiireporter.com More information on Dr. Gelb’s services and related resources available at” http://www.DrGelbSays.com

Hundreds of New State Laws Take Effect

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DENVER, Dec. 30 (UPI) — Hundreds of new state laws become effective Wednesday, cracking down on everything from terrorism to drunk driving.

In New Hampshire, those convicted of threatening or using biological or chemical weapons will face stiffer penalties. In New Mexico, drunk drivers will be required to use an ignition interlock system for 12 months after a drunk driving conviction.

Those two laws are among scores that take effect Jan. 1, according to survey conducted by the National Conference of State Legislatures. Many other states make their laws effective with the governor’s signature or 30 to 90 days after they are signed.

New Hampshire is the only state putting new homeland security measures into effect but about 1,500 bills similar bills were considered by states this year, according to Gene Rose, a spokesman for the NCSL in Denver.

“A number of other states are kind of holding back because of budget concerns and also trying to see what the federal government is going to do in terms of assistance to states,” he said.

State governments are facing budget deficits totaling more than $60 billion in the next fiscal year because of declining tax revenues. They also have to close the books are more than $17 billion in shortfalls incurred during the current fiscal year.

Other new laws address problems in education, traffic safety, criminal justice, labor, business and economic development.

Here are some of the new laws:

*North Carolina will allow teachers who do not wish to work full-time the option of job-sharing in order to address a statewide shortage of teachers.

*California will require a minor to wear a safety helmet with scooters, skateboards and inline skates.

*Maine children between the ages of 4 and 8 will be required to sit in an approved child restraint system while riding in a vehicle.

*Nebraska’s minor traffic offenders will have the option of successfully completing a pre-trial diversion program in exchange for charges being dropped.

*Alaska’s physician assistants will officially be recognized as health care providers subject to similar malpractice and discrimination laws as doctors.

*Californians will be able to donate to the State Children’s Trust Fund, a fund to support innovative child abuse and neglect prevention programs, through a check-off on state tax returns.

*Illinois state employees will get paid time off when they donate organs, blood or blood platelets.

*Utah health insurers and employers will no longer be able to use genetic information for certain business decisions including determination of coverage, hiring or promotions.

*New Hampshire hackers may face charges for introducing contaminants that impair computer operations or lead to the loss of property.

*California workers will know 60 days in advance if they are going to be subject to mass layoffs under a new state warning law.

*Kentucky motorists will be able to obtain special license plates that advocate spaying and neutering pets.

*Washington state chiropractors will be added to the list of those allowed to serve as officials at a boxing, kickboxing or martial arts event.

Copyright 2002 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

Hundreds of New State Laws Take Effect

0

DENVER, Dec. 30 (UPI) — Hundreds of new state laws become effective Wednesday, cracking down on everything from terrorism to drunk driving. In New Hampshire, those convicted of threatening or using biological or chemical weapons will face stiffer penalties. In New Mexico, drunk drivers will be required to use an ignition interlock system for 12 months after a drunk driving conviction. Those two laws are among scores that take effect Jan. 1, according to survey conducted by the National Conference of State Legislatures. Many other states make their laws effective with the governor’s signature or 30 to 90 days after they are signed. New Hampshire is the only state putting new homeland security measures into effect but about 1,500 bills similar bills were considered by states this year, according to Gene Rose, a spokesman for the NCSL in Denver. “A number of other states are kind of holding back because of budget concerns and also trying to see what the federal government is going to do in terms of assistance to states,” he said. State governments are facing budget deficits totaling more than $60 billion in the next fiscal year because of declining tax revenues. They also have to close the books are more than $17 billion in shortfalls incurred during the current fiscal year. Other new laws address problems in education, traffic safety, criminal justice, labor, business and economic development. Here are some of the new laws: *North Carolina will allow teachers who do not wish to work full-time the option of job-sharing in order to address a statewide shortage of teachers. *California will require a minor to wear a safety helmet with scooters, skateboards and inline skates. *Maine children between the ages of 4 and 8 will be required to sit in an approved child restraint system while riding in a vehicle. *Nebraska’s minor traffic offenders will have the option of successfully completing a pre-trial diversion program in exchange for charges being dropped. *Alaska’s physician assistants will officially be recognized as health care providers subject to similar malpractice and discrimination laws as doctors. *Californians will be able to donate to the State Children’s Trust Fund, a fund to support innovative child abuse and neglect prevention programs, through a check-off on state tax returns. *Illinois state employees will get paid time off when they donate organs, blood or blood platelets. *Utah health insurers and employers will no longer be able to use genetic information for certain business decisions including determination of coverage, hiring or promotions. *New Hampshire hackers may face charges for introducing contaminants that impair computer operations or lead to the loss of property. *California workers will know 60 days in advance if they are going to be subject to mass layoffs under a new state warning law. *Kentucky motorists will be able to obtain special license plates that advocate spaying and neutering pets. *Washington state chiropractors will be added to the list of those allowed to serve as officials at a boxing, kickboxing or martial arts event. Copyright 2002 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

Tiki Bars Not New to Hawaii, Despite What Journalists Say

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Lately in the consumer media, there’s been some brouhaha about Oahu “finally getting its own Tiki Bar”… and other exclamations leading some to think this is a new thing.

May I remind the journalists; Oahu has been graced for decades, with what they term “tiki bars.” Since at least the 1930s, Oahu has enjoyed the likes of Don the Beachcomber, Trader Vic’s, and many others before and after them.

Later the Waikikian’s Tahitian Lanai and the Papeete Bar. As these slowly closed and made way for the implementation of that devil’s motto chanted by developers and politicians; “Highest and best use,” these restaurants and bars were supplanted by chain stores, large corporate chain fast food joints, high end designer wear stores and others that could handle the heftier lease rates.

So, as these Polynesian palaces slowly went the way of the wind, our friend at la Mariana, Annette, began acquiring many of the authentic artifact and decor pieces to fill her growing Tiki bar and grill; La Mariana. This has been in almost continual operation since 1955. We hear “didn’t we pioneer tiki culture back in the 1950’s?”

We certainly did, although it was not known as such. Basically, it was Polynesian Restaurants, Tropical drinks, Old Hawaii style decor. The Polynesian islands were both the origin and the inspiration and the influence of this original “Theme Restaurant,” which was replicated and scattered through America in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, and even around the world.

This current emphasis on the word “tiki” being ascribed to food, decor, drinks, has had somewhat of a warped effect on the genre to the point we have lost touch with the authentic, the source, the originators, much of which is still with us.

We are scolded; “… we’re the last in the pool. Something’s wrong when Portland Ore. can beat us.” No, Portland did not beat us. After a visit to our islands in the late 40’s some fella named Roy bought a horse and buggy stop and turned it into an old style Polynesian restaurant. We here in the islands, have had the “real thing” for many years antedating this.

Why allude to Portland at all, as “beating us”? Donn Beach started his chain in Calif. in the 30’s after travelling all through the tropics; Polynesia and the Caribbean, learning of rum and exotic food in numerous original “tiki bars” and Polynesian restaurants.

We hear and see things like: “Why it took so long to get our own tiki bar I’ll never know” tells us maybe a particular journalist oughta get out more often, or do a little research on this intriguing genre. And please don’t act surprised that there are and were more authentic “tiki bars” around, ones that use real thatch and prefer no foam tikis.

There are “tiki bars” all through Oahu, if one is really interested in knowing them. Heck; if you have any attachment to, or interest in the old style Polynesian restaurant, you can’t help but stumble upon them now and then.

”’Allen StJames is a resident of Honolulu and can be reached via email at:”’ mailto:tiki@tikitrader.com

Tiki Bars Not New to Hawaii, Despite What Journalists Say

0

Lately in the consumer media, there’s been some brouhaha about Oahu “finally getting its own Tiki Bar”… and other exclamations leading some to think this is a new thing. May I remind the journalists; Oahu has been graced for decades, with what they term “tiki bars.” Since at least the 1930s, Oahu has enjoyed the likes of Don the Beachcomber, Trader Vic’s, and many others before and after them. Later the Waikikian’s Tahitian Lanai and the Papeete Bar. As these slowly closed and made way for the implementation of that devil’s motto chanted by developers and politicians; “Highest and best use,” these restaurants and bars were supplanted by chain stores, large corporate chain fast food joints, high end designer wear stores and others that could handle the heftier lease rates. So, as these Polynesian palaces slowly went the way of the wind, our friend at la Mariana, Annette, began acquiring many of the authentic artifact and decor pieces to fill her growing Tiki bar and grill; La Mariana. This has been in almost continual operation since 1955. We hear “didn’t we pioneer tiki culture back in the 1950’s?” We certainly did, although it was not known as such. Basically, it was Polynesian Restaurants, Tropical drinks, Old Hawaii style decor. The Polynesian islands were both the origin and the inspiration and the influence of this original “Theme Restaurant,” which was replicated and scattered through America in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, and even around the world. This current emphasis on the word “tiki” being ascribed to food, decor, drinks, has had somewhat of a warped effect on the genre to the point we have lost touch with the authentic, the source, the originators, much of which is still with us. We are scolded; “… we’re the last in the pool. Something’s wrong when Portland Ore. can beat us.” No, Portland did not beat us. After a visit to our islands in the late 40’s some fella named Roy bought a horse and buggy stop and turned it into an old style Polynesian restaurant. We here in the islands, have had the “real thing” for many years antedating this. Why allude to Portland at all, as “beating us”? Donn Beach started his chain in Calif. in the 30’s after travelling all through the tropics; Polynesia and the Caribbean, learning of rum and exotic food in numerous original “tiki bars” and Polynesian restaurants. We hear and see things like: “Why it took so long to get our own tiki bar I’ll never know” tells us maybe a particular journalist oughta get out more often, or do a little research on this intriguing genre. And please don’t act surprised that there are and were more authentic “tiki bars” around, ones that use real thatch and prefer no foam tikis. There are “tiki bars” all through Oahu, if one is really interested in knowing them. Heck; if you have any attachment to, or interest in the old style Polynesian restaurant, you can’t help but stumble upon them now and then. ”Allen StJames is a resident of Honolulu and can be reached via email at:” mailto:tiki@tikitrader.com