Tuesday, November 29th is GIVING TUESDAY!

With 4,054 members in our FaceBook group, we can all make a tremendous impact by doing our part. Here are 4 easy ways to get started.

1) GIVE YOUR TIME. Commit to do a 1-hour cleanup of any location that needs help. Have trouble deciding? Join us for any of our weekly events here:

https://www.808cleanups.org/calendar/

Share your cleanup stories on social media to multiply our outreach and use the hashtags #givingtuesday and #808cleanups!

2) GIVE YOUR MONEY. Consider a $10 donation. To maintain and GROW our ability to provide stewardship and resources to every volunteer on every island. Your $10 donation can get a volunteer a magnet tool to remove pallet bonfire nails, or enough gloves for 10 volunteers, or enough biodegradable solution to remove 5 graffiti tags. You can donate online right now at:

https://www.808cleanups.org/donate/

3) Give botha dn get a workout, too. Join Fawn for Donation-based POP Pilates on Tuesday!

https://www.808cleanups.org/…/donation-based-sunset-pop-p…/…

4) Make sure to designate 808 Cleanups as your charity at Amazon Smile! Direct link here:

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/47-3528201

Mahalo everyone. I encourage all our supporters to get involved in giving time and money to a cleaner, safer, and stronger Hawaii—starting right now.

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After 22-y of self-funding social improvement projects, I can say that if the wealth holders in our society would spend 40-60% of their income on social improvement projects, these islands would be a much nicer place. Whether it is building community resilience, giving voice-to-the-voiceless, or making visible-the-invisible, my project teams envision, innovate, and demonstrate community improvements, through inspiration, education, lean action and community synergy, focused in the areas of conservation, agriculture, and energy innovation. For several years I served on the Umematsu and Yasu Watada Lectures on Peace, Social Justice and the Environment, bringing voices like Frances Moore Lappe, David Korten, Richard Heinberg, Helena Norberg Hodge and Dr. Steven Schneider to Honolulu. I've been a social philanthropist in the fabric of the islands, via for-benefit, for-profit and faith networks. Change agent, strategic sustainability advisor, and inspirational public speaker, I've spoken to audiences across Hawaii's business, government, and educational sectors. Mixing a friendly approach, a professional curiosity, and downbeat humor, in my presentations, shift happens. At HawaiiReporter.com, I write about science, climate change, spirituality, and systems, and how these scale to social improvement.