BY HONOLULU DISTRICT PUBLIC AFFAIRS – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Honolulu District recently completed a successful Fiscal Year 2010 during which 685 contract actions were awarded totaling $272.6 million, including more than $147 million to small business firms.

During the final month – the fiscal year-end contract award period – Honolulu District awarded nearly $93 million in new contracts.

Honolulu District contracts signify the Corps’ commitment to provide high-quality facilities to the armed forces of the United States and to protect and improve the lives of the people of Hawaii and the region.

Honolulu District Contracting awarded 56% of its total FY10 contract awards to small businesses – exceeding almost all yearly District and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ small business goals.

The basis of the Small Business Program is to ensure that small businesses have the maximum opportunity to win Department of Defense (DoD) contracts, which is basic to the economic well-being and security of the Nation. This status cannot be achieved without the liability to set aside procurements for the purpose of encouraging and developing small businesses to grow and prosper. Contracting with these firms strengthens the economy, generates competition, lowers overall costs, creates innovations, provides more jobs than any other sector, and enhances good business practices.

Small businesses play a key role in the Army’s sustaining base in vital areas of military readiness, economic security and advanced technology.

The President is required to annually establish government-wide goals for procurement contracts awarded to small businesses (Section 644(g) of 15 U.S.C.). The Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Office, Office of Secretary of Defense, negotiates Department of Defense goals with the Small Business Administration and then develops and disseminates the annual small business goals for the fiscal year. Goal utilization assists to assure small business receives a fair proportion of DoD awards.

Significant Corps contracts awarded at the end of FY10 included:

W9128A-10-C-0008, FY2010 PN KNMD109501, Parking Apron and Taxiways, Hickam Air Force Base, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, was awarded Aug, 26 to Watts Contractors, LLC, Honolulu, HI for $8,050,000.00.

W9128A-10-C-0009, FY10 MCA PN55281 Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility, Helemano Military Reservation, Oahu, Hawaii, was awarded Sept. 17 to LEDCOR Construction Hawaii LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, for $15,366,000.

W9128A-09-D-0009-0004, Maintenance and Repairs, Kunia, Hawaii was awarded to Performance Systems, Inc., Honolulu, Hawaii, Sept. 22 under the $100M 8(A) Multiple Award Task Order Contract (MATOC), for $2,781,060.00.

W9128A-09-D-0011-0002, FY10 OMA A-001, Repair 2nd and 3rd Floor, Building 108, Wheeler Army Airfield, Oahu, Hawaii was awarded Sept. 27 to Dawson-DBS Hawaii, LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii for $2,433,180.00.

W9128A-06-D-0002, Task Order 0003 under the $100M MATOC, FY10 UMMCA PN 72067 – Construct Plumbing and Carpentry Shops Facility, Roi-Namur, Kwajalein Atoll and FY10 Miscellaneous Repairs, Bldg. 603, Kwajalein Atoll was awarded Sept. 29 to San Juan Construction, Montrose, Colorado for $3,158,420.26.

W9128A-09-D-0019, Task Order No. 0012, FY10 OMN Renovate Medical-Dental Clinic, Bldg. 22, Naval Computer and Telecommunications Area Master Station, Oahu, Hawaii was awarded to SUMO-NAN JV II LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, Sept. 29 for $2,020,456.00.

W9128A-07-D-0005 Task Order 0004, FY10 DHP PN 77226 Repair G1B Electrical Unit Substation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Oahu, Hawaii was awarded to SYSKA/NAN JV, Honolulu, Hawaii, Sept. 29 for $9,672,551.00.

W9128A-06-D-0011, Task Order 0008,  FY10 OMAF Various Repairs, Kaena Point Satellite Tracking Station, Oahu, Hawaii was awarded to Alutiiq-Mele, LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, Sept. 30 for $1,785,186.00.

W9128A-09-D-0019-0009, FY10 OMA Macomb Roundabout, Schofield Barracks, Oahu, Hawaii, was awarded Sept. 29 to SUMO-NAN JV II LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, for $2,351,211.92.

W9128A-09-D-0022, T.O. 0005, Site Investigations (SI), Aua Fuel Farm, Aua, American Samoa, FUDS Project No. H09AS000703 was awarded Sept. 20 to Engineering\Remediation Resources Group, Honolulu, Hawaii for $188,570.09.

W9128A-09-D-0022, T.O. 0007, Institutional Controls for Public Health & Safety Awareness at the Defense Environmental Restoration Program, Formerly Used Defense Site of Former Popoki Target Area, Puna, Island of Hawaii was awarded Sept. 24 to Engineering\Remediation Resources Group, Honolulu, Hawaii for $170,253.90.

U.S. Army-Hawaii benefitted from many contracts awarded and completed by the Corps of Engineers during FY10. Among them were contracts awarded in November 2009 for architect-engineer services for the design of FY11-FY 15 projects, phases one through four, of a Command and Control Facility Complex – the future home of U.S. Army-Pacific (USARPAC) Headquarters, Fort Shafter, for $21,526,998.

According to U.S. Army Pacific Commander Lt. Gen. Benjamin Mixon, the facility will enable USARPAC to exercise responsibilities across the Pacific Region, including additional responsibilities supporting the U.S. alliance with South Korea.

In January, in keeping with sustainability initiatives, USACE awarded a $1,539,810 contract to replace a roof and install two photovoltaic systems on Aliamanu Military Reservation buildings. The 47-kilowatt and 37-kilowatt photovoltaic systems will harness and convert the sun’s rays to create electricity. They will also help foster a clean, energy-independent and efficient infrastructure on Oahu – part of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded project.

Additionally, a $2,726,540 ARRA contract in January replaced the water treatment plant generator at Schofield Barracks. This Multiple Award Task Order Contract (MATOC) project helps create and maintain jobs in Hawaii.

A maile lei ribbon untying ceremony April 15 celebrated the opening of the $27 million state-of-the-art, six-story barracks complex at Fort Shafter. Of special note, the barracks is environmentally friendly and consumes 30-percent less energy than older barracks.

In August, Honolulu District awarded a design-bid-build contract to an 8(a) small business company, for $9,252,522, to construct a new single-story, 10,000-square foot Conference and Technology Learning Center for the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies on the grounds of Fort DeRussy in Waikiki. The building will serve as a state-of-the-art Information Integration Learning Laboratory. It will that include a 108-person plenary space, six seminar rooms, audiovisual and computer server rooms, required ancillary spaces and an ethno-botanical garden.

In September, Fort Shafter’s Aloha Center – well-remembered by Soldiers, families and those who lived, worked or traveled through Fort Shafter during the past 70 years – was completed. The two-year, nearly $7 million rehabilitation and restoration project of Bldg. 330 overcame several challenges. Because of its advanced age, the building was in need of major restoration since most of the internal structure had become termite eaten and unstable. Because of historic preservation requirements, specific portions of the building could not be demolished, essentially making engineers rethink how to reconstruct on and around untouchable sections of the facility. Working closely with Honolulu District’s architect, Maydean Martin, and U.S. Army Garrison- Hawaii’s Directorate of Public Works architectural historian, Ken Hays, the contractor carefully removed almost 65-percent of the original structure. Contractors restored the facility to its original exterior appearance from the 1940s and brought the facility up to current building codes – adhering to current antiterrorism and force protection requirements.

Most recently, in October, USACE completed a five-month, $874,733 renovation of Schofield Barracks’ historic white clapboard country-style Soldiers Chapel – a 97-year-old sanctuary that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and part of the National Register District at Schofield Barracks.

Honolulu District is committed to building and facilitating structures that improve communities in which service members and their families live and that provide jobs and money which stimulate the local economy.

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